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Exploring the Wetland: Integrating the Fish and Plant Remains into a Case Study from Tianluoshan, a Middle Neolithic Site in China

  • Ying Zhang
Chapter
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Tianluoshan is a key site of Middle Neolithic Age in the lower Yangtze River region in China. Radiocarbon dating indicates that it was occupied from 5000 to 4000 Cal BC. This paper intends to discuss the exploitation of wetland by analyzing fish remains and integrating zooarchaeological and archaeobotanical research. Fish remains are studied thoroughly through species identification, body length reconstruction, and seasonality assessment, revealing that three major fish, snakehead (Channa argus), common carp (Cyprinus sp.), and crucian carp (Carassius carassius), which are captured constantly throughout the year, are staple food resources for Tianluoshan people. The wetland is not only the main fishing ground but also the concentrated locale for gathering and probably rice farming. Knowledge of ecological information is the fundamental of any hunting, gathering, and fishing activities. Tianluoshan people have developed lifeways highly adaptive to wetlands with such knowledge. Integrated research of zooarchaeology, archaeobotany, and ethnography benefits the interpretation of the interrelationship between human beings and the environment.

Keywords

Tianluoshan Wetland Fishing Integration 

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Archaeology and Museology, Peking UniversityBeijingChina

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