Cervical Lymphadenitis in Children

Chapter

Abstract

Cervical lymphadenitis is a common complaint of childhood and most often indicates a local or systemic infectious etiology rather than malignancy or serious disease. Cervical lymphadenitis may present acutely (usually bacterial or viral in etiology), or follow an indolent course (for example atypical organisms, animal or vector-borne infections) leading to subacute/chronic lymphadenitis. A complete history (including exposure and dietary history) and physical examination are important to determine appropriate initial diagnostic evaluation and/or empiric therapy. High level imaging and surgical intervention may be indicated to prevent complications or achieve cure. The prognosis is excellent with most children making a complete recovery.

Keywords

Acute cervical lymphadenitis Subacute or chronic cervical lymphadenitis Suppurative complications of lymphadenitis Empiric therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases SectionBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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