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Critical Autism Studies and Robot Therapy

  • Kathleen Richardson
Chapter
Part of the Social and Cultural Studies of Robots and AI book series (SOCUSRA)

Abstract

This chapter explores an exciting new field of Critical Autism Studies (CAS), a movement of adults with autism, parents, psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, disabled activists and social scientists creating a new narrative around autism and challenging existing orthodoxy in autism studies that turns autistic persons into ‘brains’ (neuroscience) or ‘things’ (a set of diagnostic categories of mental disorders). This movement refocuses our attention on the humanity and interpersonal relationships of people with autism and the multitude of relationships they encounter through various health services. Robot therapy is built on problematic foundations that view people with autism as lacking in empathy or meaningful sociality. CAS could provide the template for breaking away from the dehumanising descriptions of autistic persons towards an integrative humanistic paradigm.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Richardson
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of TechnologyDe Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK

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