Advertisement

Attachment Theory and Autism

  • Kathleen Richardson
Chapter
Part of the Social and Cultural Studies of Robots and AI book series (SOCUSRA)

Abstract

In this chapter is a look at attachment theory and the social history of parenting and motherhood. I explore the role of parenting and attachment as important to unfolding this narrative. Attachment Theory is the study of relationship and developed as a research area in the 1940s. Developed by John Bowlby, a psychoanalyst, Attachment Theory has been developed in a multitude of ways.

Bibliography

  1. Ainsworth, Mary D. Salter. 1978. The Bowlby-Ainsworth Attachment Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (03): 436–438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ainsworth, M.S., M.C. Blehar, E. Waters, and S.N. Wall. 1978. Patterns of Attachment: A Psychological Study of the Strange Situation. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  3. Baron-Cohen, Simon. 2011. Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty. Vol. 30. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  4. Bernays, Edward L. 2005 [1928]. Propaganda. With an Introduction by Mark Crispin Miller. Brooklyn: Ig Publishing.Google Scholar
  5. Bernays, E. L., & Miller, M. C. (2005). Propaganda. Brooklyn, N.Y: Ig Publishing.Google Scholar
  6. Bettelheim, Bruno. 1967. Empty Fortress. New York and London: Free Press; Collier-Macmillan.Google Scholar
  7. Bibles, Collins Anglicised ESV. 2008. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. London: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  8. Billington, T. 2016. Critical Autism and Critical Neuroscience: Towards a Science of Research and Practice. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  9. Bowlby, John. 1973. Attachment and Loss: Anxiety and Anger. Vol. 95. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  10. ———. 1980. Attachment and Loss: Sadness and Depression. Vol. 109. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  11. ———. 1982. Attachment and Loss. Vol. 79. 2nd ed. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  12. ———. 2008. Attachment. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  13. Broadbent, Elizabeth, Rebecca Stafford, and Bruce MacDonald. 2009. Acceptance of Healthcare Robots for the Older Population: Review and Future Directions. International Journal of Social Robotics 1 (4): 319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Candland, Douglas Keith. 1994. Introduction. In The Forbidden Experiment: The Story of the Wild Boy of Aveyron. With a New Introduction by Douglas Keith Candland, ed. Roger Shattuck. New York: Kodansha International.Google Scholar
  15. Candland, Douglas K. 1995. Feral Children and Clever Animals: Reflections on Human Nature. New York: Oxford University Press on Demand.Google Scholar
  16. Collins, G. 2016. Does a Diagnosis of ASD Help Us to Help a Person with Intellectual Disabilities? In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  17. Crittenden, P.M., and M.D. Ainsworth. 1989. Chapter 14 Child Maltreatment and Attachment Theory. In Child Maltreatment: Theory and Research on the Causes and Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect, ed. Dante Cicchetti and Vicki Carlson, 432–463. London: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Davis, K. 2016. How Rude? Autism as a Study in Ability. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  19. de Graaf, M.M.A. 2016. An Ethical Evaluation of Human–Robot Relationships. International Journal of Social Robotics 8 (4): 589–598.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Dennis, Wayne. 1941. The Significance of Feral Man. The American Journal of Psychology 54 (3): 425–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Engels, Friedrich. 2010. The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  22. Freud, Sigmund, and James Strachey. 1950. Totem and Taboo: Some Points of Agreement Between the Mental Lives of Savages and Neurotics. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  23. Gilligan, Carol. 1982. In a Different Voice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Grisaffe, Douglas B., and Hieu P. Nguyen. 2011. Antecedents of Emotional Attachment to Brands. Journal of Business Research 64 (10): 1052–1059.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Haraway, Donna Jeanne. 1991. Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature. London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
  26. Harlow, Harry F. 1958. The Nature of Love. American Psychologist 13 (12): 673.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Harlow, Harry F., and Robert R. Zimmermann. 1958. The Development of Affectional Responses in Infant Monkeys. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 102 (5): 501–509.Google Scholar
  28. Hassall, R. 2016. Does Everyone with Autism Have the Same Underlying Condition? In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  29. Haydon-Laurelut, M. 2016. Critical Systemic Therapy: Autism Stories and Disabled People with Learning Difficulties. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  30. Hodge, N. 2016. Schools Without Labels. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  31. Holmes, Jeremy. 1993. John Bowlby and Attachment Theory. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  32. Huber, A., A. Weiss, and M. Rauhala. 2016. The Ethical Risk of Attachment: How to Identify, Investigate and Predict Potential Ethical Risks in the Development of Social Companion Robots. Conference Paper. HRI ’16 The Eleventh ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction, pp. 367–374.Google Scholar
  33. Klein, Noami. 2001. No Logo. Hammersmith. London: Flamingo.Google Scholar
  34. Koehn, Daryl. 1998. Rethinking Feminist Ethics: Care, Trust and Empathy. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Latif, S. 2016. The Ethics and Consequences of Making Autism Spectrum Disorder. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  36. Mallet, R., and K. Runswick-Cole. 2016. The Commodification of Autism: What’s at Stake? In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  37. McGuire, A. 2016. Life Without Autism: A Cultural Logic of Violence. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  38. Miller, Alice. 1987. The Drama of Being a Child: And the Search for the True Self. London: Virago.Google Scholar
  39. Muskett, T. 2016. Examining Language and Communication in Autism Spectrum Disorder – In Context. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  40. Newton, Michael. 2002. Savage Girls and Wild Boys: A History of Feral Children. London: Faber and Faber.Google Scholar
  41. Piaget, Jean. 1964. Part I: Cognitive Development in Children: Piaget Development and Learning. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 2 (3): 176–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. ———. 2013. The Construction of Reality in the Child. Vol. 82. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  43. Pino, M., M. Boulay, F. Jouen, and A.-S. Rigaud. 2015. Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Toward Socially Assistive Robots. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience 7: 141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Richardson, Kathleen. 2015. An Anthropology of Robots and AI: Annihilation Anxiety and Machines. Vol. 20. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  45. Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. 2000. Discourse on the Origin of Inequality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Roy, Souvik, Abhilash Ponnam, and Santanu Mandal. 2017. Comprehending Technology Attachment in the Case of Smart Phone-Applications: An Empirical Study. Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations (JECO) 15 (1): 23–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Runswick-Cole, K., R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. 2016. Future Directions. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  48. Russell, G. 2016. Early Diagnosis of Autism: Is Earlier Always Better? In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  49. Rutter, Michael. 1972. Maternal Deprivation Reassessed. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  50. Sayers, Janet. 1992. Mothering Psychoanalysis: Helene Deutsch, Karen Horney, Anna Freud and Melanie Klein. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  51. Sevenhuijsen, Selma. 1998. Citizenship and the Ethics of Care: Feminist Considerations on Justice, Morality, and Politics. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  52. Shattuck, Roger. 1980. The Forbidden Experiment: The Story of the Wild Boy of Aveyron. London: Secker and Warburg.Google Scholar
  53. Shattuck, Roger. 1994. The Forbidden Experiment: The Story of the Wild Boy of Aveyron. With a New Introduction by Douglas Keith Candland. New York: Kodansha International.Google Scholar
  54. Shorter, E. 1975. The Making of the Modern Family, 29–30. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  55. Silverman, Chloe. 2011. Understanding Autism: Parents, Doctors, and the History of a Disorder. Princeton: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Simon, G. 2016. Thinking Systems: ‘Mind’ as Relational Activity. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  57. Sprehe, J. Timothy. 1961. Feral Man and the Social Animal. The American Catholic Sociological Review 22 (2): 161–167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Stawarska, Beata. 2009. Between You and I: Dialogical Phenomenology.Google Scholar
  59. Stone, L. 1979. The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500–1800. Vol. 43. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  60. Timimi, S., and B. McCabe. 2016a. What Have We Learned from the Science of Autism? In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  61. ———. 2016b. Autism Screening and Diagnostic Tools. In Re-thinking Autism: Diagnosis, Identity and Equality, ed. K. Runswick-Cole, R. Mallett, and S. Timimi. London/Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  62. Turkle, Sherry. 2012. Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  63. Vlachos, Pavlos A., Aristeidis Theotokis, Katerina Pramatari, and Adam Vrechopoulos. 2010. Consumer-Retailer Emotional Attachment: Some Antecedents and the Moderating Role of Attachment Anxiety. European Journal of Marketing 44 (9/10): 1478–1499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Winnicott, D.W. 1965. The Family and Individual Development. London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  65. Zingg, Robert M. 1940. Feral Man and Extreme Cases of Isolation. The American Journal of Psychology 53 (4): 487–517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Richardson
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of TechnologyDe Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK

Personalised recommendations