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Dancing Against the Tide: Reconstructing Irish Cultural Identity in Ken Loach’s Jimmy’s Hall

  • Katarzyna Ojrzyńska
Chapter
Part of the New Directions in Irish and Irish American Literature book series (NDIIAL)

Abstract

The chapter examines the representation of Irishness in Ken Loach’s film Jimmy’s Hall, which tells the story of a rural dance hall founded in the early 1930s by Jimmy Gralton—a returned Irish emigrant who, due to his leftist sympathies, was the first and so far the only Irish person to be deported from the Republic. Analysing the film in the context of Irish heritage cinema, Irish dance traditions and Michel Foucault’s concept of heterotopia, Ojrzyńska argues that much as the film underscores the importance of the cultural dissidence flourishing in Jimmy’s hall, it may also be considered as an instance of nostalgic romanticisation of the rebellious Irish spirit. In this respect, Loach follows certain popular cultural heritage policies that shaped twentieth-century mainstream Irish culture.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katarzyna Ojrzyńska
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Studies in Drama and Pre-1800 English LiteratureUniversity of ŁódźŁódźPoland

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