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Kierkegaard on Being Human

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Abstract

In this chapter, I introduce several fundamental aspects of Søren Kierkegaard’s thought. I discuss his philosophical anthropology and his related thoughts on becoming oneself, as well as on the different life-views. Other important themes are Kierkegaard’s critique on the modern ideal of objectivity, his views on the ethical and the religious, and his complex ideas about communication. The important point I aim to establish is that we should understand Kierkegaard’s authorship as a Socratic attempt to assist modern human beings in becoming themselves: it seeks to motivate them to embrace ethical and (ultimately) Christian existence.

Keywords

Kierkegaard Self Objectivity Socrates Indirect communication 

Bibliography

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Radboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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