Beyond Human Rights Law Naïveté

  • José Julián López
Chapter

Abstract

A number of scholars have recently drawn attention to the law naïveté inherent in much human rights scholarship—i.e., the illusory expectations of the social power and efficacy of human rights law. This is particularly surprising given the anaemic results produced by the internationalisation of human rights law to date. Drawing on sociolegal scholarship, López proposes conceptualising law as a social practice to explore how juridical practices have historically become entangled within the human rights political imaginary. To do so he draws on the pioneering work of Yves Dezalay and Bryant Garth, Michael Madsen, and Anthony Woodiwiss unravelling the surprising and fateful entanglements of the human rights political imaginary with law in the US, Europe, Chile, Canada, and the UN.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Julián López
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OttawaOttawaCanada

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