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Finite Element Models of the Knee Joint

  • Zahra Trad
  • Abdelwahed Barkaoui
  • Moez Chafra
  • João Manuel R. S. Tavares
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

Geometry, material properties and loading and boundary conditions are important aspects in FEA modeling of the knee. Many assumptions and concessions must be made while considering these aspects, as well as the computational time. For example, it is very computationally expensive to model the cartilage or the menisci as poroelastic materials. Moreover, modeling the cartilage as three layers (superficial, middle and deep) is very difficult using 3D models, but can be easily accomplished using 2D models, and simulations can therefore be completely performed.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zahra Trad
    • 1
  • Abdelwahed Barkaoui
    • 1
  • Moez Chafra
    • 2
    • 3
  • João Manuel R. S. Tavares
    • 4
  1. 1.LR-11-ES19 Laboratoire de Mécanique Appliquée et Ingénierie (LR-MAI), Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de TunisUniversité de Tunis El ManarTunisTunisie
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Systèmes et de Mécanique AppliquéeEcole Polytechnique de TunisTunisTunisie
  3. 3.IPEIEMUniversité de Tunis El ManarTunisTunisie
  4. 4.Instituto de Ciência e Inovação em Engenharia Mecânica e Engenharia Industrial, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Faculdade de EngenhariaUniversidade do PortoPortoPortugal

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