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Women’s Perceptions of Agency and Power

  • Sarwar Alam
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter engages theories of power and agency, and compares these theories with the local knowledge of power and agency of everyday people. This chapter insists on the notion that power is a polysemic concept. Narrative genres of the informants and other data collected during the fieldwork show how the informants’ perceptions are mediated through religious thought, and how some of them use religious knowledge in negotiating their power and agency. The data reveal that men’s power and agency are taken for granted by all whereas women’s agency and power are to be earned and proved; women do not inherit agency or power but rather they “do” agency and power. Their power and agency are also contested and negotiated. Thus, this chapter argues that agency and power are gendered conceptions, and so are time and space.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarwar Alam
    • 1
  1. 1.King Fahd Center for Middle East StudiesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

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