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Introduction

  • Sarwar Alam
Chapter

Abstract

This book is an analysis of perceptions of self, power, agency, and gender of Muslim women of a rural community in Bangladesh. The informants assert that women’s power and agency are different than those of men’s. Their general perception is that almost every aspect of human life is gendered. Some of the informants argue that oftentimes people compare men’s and women’s power and agency with the same standards and criteria without considering the gendered aspect of everyday life. According to them, this is the cause of perceiving women with less power or less agency. There should be two different sets of criteria in judging men’s and women’s power and agency, some of the informants assert. These observations of the informants are contrary to popular beliefs, especially in the West, about Muslim women.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarwar Alam
    • 1
  1. 1.King Fahd Center for Middle East StudiesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

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