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Hypercyanotic Spells

  • Tageldin Ahmed
  • Yamuna Sanil
  • Sabrina M. Heidemann
Chapter

Abstract

Hypercyanotic spells are paroxysmal hypoxic episodes that are associated with certain congenital heart defects that comprise an unrestricted interventricular communication and a compromised or potentially compromised pulmonary blood flow. A typical example of such lesions is the Tetrology of Fallot.

Hypercyanotic spells either are self-resolved or respond to medical treatment when promptly recognized and aggressively treated. On the other hand, serious consequences can result from delayed treatment as these episodes can lead to vicious cycle of worsening hypoxia and acidosis resulting in arrhythmias, brain injury, and even death.

Keywords

Hypercyanotic spell Hypoxia Interventricular shunt 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tageldin Ahmed
    • 1
  • Yamuna Sanil
    • 2
  • Sabrina M. Heidemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Critical CareChildren’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Division of CardiologyChildren’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA

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