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Self-testing System Application to Remote Laboratory NetLab

  • Thomas Jonathan Zawko
  • Andrew Nafalski
  • Zorica Nedic
  • Hugh Considine
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 716)

Abstract

Remote laboratories consist of a system of real equipment that can be operated over an internet connection by an offsite end user. However, their remoteness can make them inconvenient to maintain or repair should problems occur within the system. Self-testing systems can be used to detect possible problems and address them appropriately. With the aim of improvement, this paper considers the application of self-testing systems to remote laboratories. The paper starts with an investigative review of self-testing systems to highlight the key concepts and features within them. Following this is a discussion on the methodologies used by the self-testing systems. After which, observations are made of existing self-testing systems and how they are impacted by their own self-testing capabilities. Next, we consider the potential application of self-testing methodologies to a test case system, the remote laboratory NetLab, so as to theoretically demonstrate the practical application of integrating self-testing capability to an existing remote laboratory system. Finally, the paper forms a conclusion of self-testing system applications and their potential integration to remote laboratories.

Keywords

Self-testing Self-healing Remote laboratory NetLab Engineering education 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We would like to acknowledge the Commonwealth Government of Australia funding, received under the Research Training Program (RTP), supporting the PhD project of one of the co-authors (HC).

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Jonathan Zawko
    • 1
  • Andrew Nafalski
    • 1
  • Zorica Nedic
    • 1
  • Hugh Considine
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia

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