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An Opportunistic Connectivity Network for Rural Areas in Senegal

  • A. GueyeEmail author
  • C. Mahmoudi
  • O. I. Elmimouni
  • M. L. Gueye
  • S. O. Ndiaye
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 204)

Abstract

In this paper, we present an opportunistic connectivity approach to building a network for rural areas in Senegal. Our proposed solution is based on a simple principle: given any situation, use the best connectivity solution available; and when no solution is available at the moment, use delay/intermittence tolerant solutions to offer “offline” services. Our network is built using point-to-point Long Distance Wifi links which are used wherever available. If a LD-Wifi link is not available, we use SMS service as a support for data communication. In areas with no coverage, we use DTN (Delay Tolerant Networking) solutions. For the seamless integration of all these technologies, we implement our lightweight platform on NDN (Named Data Networking), a new architecture proposed for the future Internet. A low cost implementation of the solution has been deployed in a test environment using Raspberry Pis and GSM dongles.

Keywords

Rural network deployment DTN NDN SMS Long Distance Wifi 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially accomplished under NIST Cooperative Agreement No. 70NANB16H024 with the University of Maryland. It was also partially supported by the University Alioune Diop of Bambey PGF-Sup program (Crédit IDA 4945-SN).

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Gueye
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • C. Mahmoudi
    • 3
  • O. I. Elmimouni
    • 4
  • M. L. Gueye
    • 1
  • S. O. Ndiaye
    • 1
  1. 1.Universite Alioune Diop de BambeyBambeySenegal
  2. 2.University of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  3. 3.LACL LaboratoryUniversity Paris-Est CréteilCréteilFrance
  4. 4.Mohammadia School of EngineeringRabatMorocco

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