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Commercial-Ready and Large-Scale Manufacturing of Light-Weight Aluminum Matrix Nanocomposites

  • Yuzheng ZhangEmail author
  • Miguel Verduzco
  • Andrew Parker
  • Mark Sommer
  • William HarriganJr.
  • Al Sommer
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Light-weight aluminum matrix nanocomposites (AMnCs) exhibit superior strength and stiffness compared to its alloyed counterpart, especially at elevated temperatures, which makes this material an ideal candidate for high temperature applications in automobile, aerospace and energy industries. However, the use of aluminum MMC is limited due to its prohibitively high cost in scale-up production. In 2008, a path to commercialize aluminum MMC was laid out by Gamma Alloys LLC. A unique powder metallurgy approach was used to synthesize alumina nanoparticle reinforced aluminum MMC in a cost-effective way. A uniform distribution of spherical alumina nanoparticles was achieved in the matrix using a patented powder mixing technique. This technique is compatible with all aluminum alloy systems and thus customizable based on customer’s needs. Today, Gamma Alloys’ materials have found numerous applications from structural parts of automotive engines, to military helicopter transmissions and cleats for athletic running shoes.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuzheng Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Miguel Verduzco
    • 1
  • Andrew Parker
    • 1
  • Mark Sommer
    • 1
  • William HarriganJr.
    • 1
  • Al Sommer
    • 1
  1. 1.Gamma Alloys LLCValenciaUSA

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