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“A Prince so Young as I”: Agequeerness and Marlowe’s Boy King

  • Rachel Prusko
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter suggests that Marlowe unsettles both childhood and youth as social categories by queering prince Edward in Edward II. While it is possible to read this character normatively, I argue instead for a queered subjectivity in the boy that enables resistant self-fashioning. Marlowe queers young Edward, not in a homoerotic sense, but rather by destabilizing the prince’s age, insisting on his non-normative growth. He first scripts the boy as much younger than the prince of historical record, and then causes him to grow up in what seems like an instant. Engaging Robin Bernstein’s concept of agequeerness, and Kathryn Bond Stockton’s theory of the “queer child,” I will argue that instability around the question of age creates Edward as a queer adolescent subject.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Prusko
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of English and Film StudiesUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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