Mathematics Education for Social Justice: A Case Study

  • Gustavo Bruno
  • Natalia Ruiz-López
  • César Sáenz de Castro
Chapter
Part of the ICME-13 Monographs book series (ICME13Mo)

Abstract

In this chapter, we present a case study of a mathematics teacher in a school in Madrid who identifies himself as an educator for social justice. We analyze both his classroom practice using an observation protocol, and key elements in his biography through a biographic-narrative interview, to compare what the teacher declares as ideal with his action in the classroom. From the observations of his practice, it seems that the teacher adopts an instrumental and value-neutral perspective on mathematics, but from the biographic-narrative interview we obtain both an understanding of the origins of this apparent instrumental perspective, and also many notable intuitions and critical perspectives on sociopolitical issues related to mathematics, teacher training and mathematics education research.

Keywords

Mathematics education Social justice Teacher training Secondary level Classroom practice 

References

  1. Álvarez, P. (December 3, 2016). Informe PISA. La educación española se estanca en ciencias y matemáticas y mejora levemente en lectura. El País. Recovered from: https://politica.elpais.com/politica/2016/12/05/actualidad/1480950645_168779.html. Accessed July 28, 2017.
  2. Andrade-Molina, M., & Valero, P. (2016). The effects of school geometry in the shaping of a desired child. In H. Straehler-Pohl, N. Bohlmann, & A. Pais (Eds.), The disorder of mathematics education—Challenging the socio political dimensions of research (pp. 251–270). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  3. Banks, J. A. (2004). Teaching for social justice, diversity, and citizenship in a global world. The Educational Forum, 68(4), 296–305. London: Taylor & Francis Group.Google Scholar
  4. Bateiha, S., & Reeder, S. (2014). Transforming elementary preservice teachers’ mathematical knowledge for and through social understanding. Revista Internacional de Educación para la Justicia Social (RIEJS), 3(1), 71–86.Google Scholar
  5. Bigelow, B., Harvey, B., Karp, S., & Miller, L. (Eds.). (2001). Rethinking our classrooms: Teaching for equity and justice. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools Ltd.Google Scholar
  6. Bishop, A. (1991). Mathematical enculturation—A cultural perspective on mathematics education. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  7. Burton, L. (2003). Which way social justice in mathematics education? International perspectives on mathematics education. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO.Google Scholar
  8. Chartres, M. (2008). Are my students in engaged in critical mathematics education? In J. F. Matos, P. Valero, & K. Yasukawa (Eds.), Proceedings of the Fifth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference (pp. 23–45). Lisbon: Centro de Investigação em Educação.Google Scholar
  9. Chronaki, A. (2010). Revisiting Mathemacy: A process-reading of critical mathematics education. In H. Alrø, O. Ravn, & P. Valero (Eds.), Critical mathematics education: Past, present and future (pp. 31–49). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  10. Cochran-Smith, M. (2009). Toward a theory of teacher education for social justice. In M. Fullan, A. Hargreaves, D. Hopkins, & A. Lieberman (Eds.), The international handbook of educational change (pp. 916–951). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  11. Cochran-Smith, M., Gleeson, A. M., & Mitchell, K. (2010). Teacher education for social justice: What’s pupil learning got to do with it? Berkeley Review of Education, 1(1). Resource document http://escholarship.org/uc/item/35v7b2rv#page-1. Accessed: July 31, 2017.
  12. Cochran-Smith, M., Shakman, K., Jong, C., Terrell, D., Barnatt, J., & McQuillan, P. (2009). Good and just teaching: The case for social justice in teacher education. American Journal of Education, 115(3), 1–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. D’Ambrosio, U. (1985). Ethnomathematics and its place in the history and pedagogy of mathematics. For the Learning of Mathematics, 5(1), 44–48.Google Scholar
  14. Ernest, P. (2010). The scope and limits of critical mathematics education. In H. Alrø, O. Ravn, & P. Valero (Eds.), Critical mathematics education: Past, present and future (pp. 65–87). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  15. Forrest, M. (1997). Literacy and numeracy. ALEA, Language in Mathematics Newsletter, 8, 1–10.Google Scholar
  16. Frankenstein, M. (1983). Critical mathematics education: an application of Paulo Freire’s epistemology. Journal of Education, 165(4), 315–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Frankenstein, M. (2001). Reading the world with math: Goals for a critical mathematical literacy curriculum in mathematics. AAVV, Mathematics: Shaping Australia Conference Proceedings 18th Biennial Conference of the Australian Association of Mathematics (pp. 53–64). Adelaide, SA: AAMT.Google Scholar
  18. Frankenstein, M. (2014). Which measures count for the public interest? Revista Internacional de Educación para la Justicia Social (RIEJS), 3(1), 133–156.Google Scholar
  19. Fraser, N. (2008). Escalas de justicia. Barcelona: Herder.Google Scholar
  20. Gutstein, E. (2003). Teaching and learning mathematics for social justice in an urban, latino school. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 23(1), 37–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Knijnik, G. (1993). An ethnomathematical approach in mathematical education: A matter of political power. For the Learning of Mathematics, 13(2), 23–25.Google Scholar
  22. Lubienski, S. (2002). Research, reform and equity in U.S. mathematic education. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 4(2–3), 103–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Michelli, N., & Keiser, D. (Eds.). (2005). Teacher education for democracy and social justice. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  24. Montecino, A., & Valero, P. (2016). Mathematics teachers as products and agents: To be and not to be. That’s the point!. In H. Straehler-Pohl, N. Bohlmann, & A. Pais (Eds.), The disorder of mathematics education—Challenging the socio political dimensions of research (pp. 135–152). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  25. Murillo, F. J., Román, M., & Hernández-Castilla, R. (2011). Evaluación educativa para la justicia social. Revista Iberoamericana de Evaluación Educativa, 4(1), 7–23.Google Scholar
  26. Osler, J. (2007). A guide for integrating issues of social and economic justice into mathematics curriculum. Resource document http://www.radicalmath.org/docs. Accessed: December 15, 2016.
  27. Pais, A. (2012). A critical approach to equity. In O. Skovmose & B. Greer (Eds.), Opening the cage. Critique and politics of mathematics education (pp. 49–92). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  28. Pais, A. (2016). The narcissism of mathematics education. In H. Straehler-Pohl, N. Bohlmann, & A. Pais (Eds.), The disorder of mathematics education—Challenging the socio political dimensions of research (pp. 53–63). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  29. Pedulla, J., Mitescu, E., Jong, C., & Cannady, M. (2008). Observing teaching for social justice for teachers from two pathways. Resource document. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267233961_Observing_teaching_for_social_justice_for_teachers_from_two_pathways. Accessed: January 10, 2017.
  30. Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2007). Reconstrucción de creencias, prácticas e identidades en torno a la educación matemática de alumnos inmigrantes. In J. Giménez, J. Díez-Palomar, & M. Civil (Eds.), Educación matemática y exclusión (pp. 131–146). Barcelona: Graó.Google Scholar
  31. Rasmussen, P. (2010). The critical perspective on education and on mathematics education. In H. Alrø, O. Ravn, & P. Valero (Eds.), Critical mathematics education: Past, present and future (pp. 161–169). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  32. Ruiz-López, N., Atrio Cerezo, S., Bosch Betancor, J., & Bruno, G. (2015). Características biográficas del docente de matemáticas para la justicia social en educación secundaria. In P. Scott & A. Ruiz (Eds.), Educación matemática en las Américas: 2015 (Vol. 5, pp. 56–65). Etnomatemática y sociología República Dominicana: CIAEM.Google Scholar
  33. Sáenz, C., & García, X. (2015). Matemáticas: Placer, poder, a veces dolor. Una mirada crítica sobre la matemática y su enseñanza. Madrid: UAM Ediciones.Google Scholar
  34. Sáenz de Castro, C., Bruno, G., Ruiz-López, N., & Atrio Cerezo, S. (2015). Estudio observacional sobre la docencia en matemáticas para la justicia social. In P. Scott & A. Ruiz (Eds.), Educación matemática en las Américas: 2015 (Vol. 5, pp. 126–137). Etnomatemática y Sociología República Dominicana: CIAEM.Google Scholar
  35. Secada, W. (1992). Race, ethnicity, social class, language, and achievement in mathematics. In D. A. Grouws (Ed.), Handbook of research on mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 623–660). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  36. Sen, A. K. (2010). La idea de la Justicia. Madrid: Taurus.Google Scholar
  37. Skovsmose, O. (1994). Towards a philosophy of critical mathematics education. Dordrecht: Kluwer Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Skovsmose, O., & Valero, P. (2008). Democratic access to powerful mathematical ideas. In L. D. English (Ed.), Handbook of international research in mathematics education (pp. 415–438). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  39. Straehler-Pohl, H. (2015). Mathematics, practicality and social segregation. Effects of an overtly stratifying school system. Revista Internacional de Educación para la Justicia Social (RIEJS), 3(1), 55–70.Google Scholar
  40. Valero, P. (2010). Mathematics education as a network of social practices. In V. Durand-Guerier, S. Soury-Lavergne, & F. Arzarello (Eds.), Proceedings of the sixth congress of the European society for research in mathematics education (pp. LIV-LXXX). Lyon: Institute National de Recherche Pedagogique.Google Scholar
  41. Vithal, R. (2003). In search of a pedagogy of conflict and dialogue for mathematics education. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Young, I. M. (2008). From constructivism to realism in the sociology of the curriculum. Review of Research in Education, 32, 1–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gustavo Bruno
    • 1
  • Natalia Ruiz-López
    • 1
  • César Sáenz de Castro
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Teacher Training and EducationUniversidad Autónoma de MadridMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations