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The History of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Issues in Higher Education

  • Karen Graves
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 33)

Abstract

This historiographical essay surveys histories of higher education that have examined lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) issues as a central theme, or included substantial analysis of LGBTQ issues as part of a larger argument. The focus is decidedly on experiences of sexual minorities in higher education, as students, professors, or administrative staff, and related issues. The thematic overview of this literature begins with early work that simply established the presence of LGBTQ people in the academy. Sexual politics shifted in the middle decades of the twentieth century so that by the post-World War II era government purges of homosexuals made their appearance on college campuses. A considerable part of the bibliography on the history of LGBTQ issues in higher education addresses these purges. Scholarship on LGBTQ students’ efforts to organize on campuses, and work on gender and sexuality that intersects with LGBTQ themes in higher education (in particular, studies of masculinity and the late-twentieth century sexual revolution) round out the analysis.

Keywords

Bisexual Florida Legislative Investigation Committee Gay Gay Academic Union LGBTQ Lesbian Jeannette Marks Masculinity Purge Queer Queer theory Smashing Student Homophile League Student organizations M. Carey Thomas Ttransgender Wellesley marriages Mary Woolley Women’s colleges 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationDenison UniversityGranvilleUSA

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