Analysis of MSW Potential in Terms of Processing into Granulated Fuels for Power Generation

  • Marcin Jewiarz
  • Jarosław Frączek
  • Krzysztof Mudryk
  • Marek Wróbel
  • Krzysztof Dziedzic
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Energy book series (SPE)

Abstract

Due to its morphological composition which includes mostly combustible material (plastics, paper, textiles, etc.), municipal solid waste is potentially a valuable raw material for use in power generation. On the other hand, content of incombustible fraction (glass, metal, rocks, etc.) reduces its value, particularly when solid municipal waste must be processed into the form of granulate as in case of co-combustion with coal in pulverized-fuel or fluidized-bed boilers. The process of granulation reduces also the costs of logistics processes such as transport, storage and handling. That is why the research carried out in the framework of “EkoRDF—an innovative manufacturing technology of alternative fuel from municipal waste for power and heating plants—a key component of the Polish waste management system” financed by Polish Centre for Research and Development (GEKON Programme) aimed at determining the MSW potential not only in terms of use in power generation, but mainly from the point of view of technologies of converting the waste into granulated fuels for power generation units. The test material comprised oversize and undersize fractions of municipal solid waste obtained from four sources (sorting plants). The morphological and grain-size analyses were carried out, and the parameters important from the point of view of power generation were determined (moisture content, calorific value, volatile matter content, ash content). The impact of those parameters on key stages of RDF production from waste (drying, comminution and granulation) were analysed. The analysis led to determination of acceptable raw material parameters for use in production of fuel granulates dedicated to burning in power generation units.

Keywords

Municipal solid waste Refuse derived fuel Proximate analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research are financed by Polish Centre for Research and Development and National Fund for Environmental Protection and Water Management under the GEKON Programme—project No: GEKON2/05/268002/17/2015. “EkoRDF—an innovative manufacturing technology of alternative fuel from municipal waste for power and heating plants—a key component of the Polish waste management system”.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and Agrophisics, Faculty of Production and Power EngineeringUniversity of Agriculture in KrakowKrakowPoland

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