Advertisement

Globalization Is Dead: Long Live the Globalization!?

  • Silvia Mărginean
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

Globalization was the mainstream paradigm in the last 70 years, long enough to create and explain prosperity and welfare in a connected world. Recently, there are many signs that we are reaching a turning point. From jobs, wages, and unemployment to immigrants and Brexit, all the key debates emphasize that the world is preparing for a new kind of globalization which will be less about countries and multinationals and more about people. There is no doubt that old globalization had winners and losers, but more than ever, the voice of the people who reject globalization was heard in 2016, specifically in the UK and USA. The world will have to deal with new institutions, and technologies and will have to find new indicators to measure these trends. European Integration itself, the most powerful success story of the post-War World II, is under question. The aim of this paper is to examine how, in the last year, mainstream economists and organizations reacted and contributed to the idea that the old globalization will be replaced by a new kind of globalization or if there are signs that a completely different paradigm will emerge. The methodology was to systematize the contributions as they were reflected in journals, scientific articles, conference papers, and different reliable online sources. As we emphasize in the title, the results of the review show that there are visible signs for the end of globalization as we know it and the seeds of a new form of globalization are already visible.

Keywords

Globalization Brexit New globalization 

References

  1. Antentas, J.M.: Internationalist challenges: antiglobalisation, occupy, and indignados. Globalizations. 13(4), 469–483 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1080/14747731.2015.1041270 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Armstrong, A., Van de Ven, J.: The impact of possible migration scenarios after 'Brexit' on the state pension system. Economies. 4(4), (2016). https://doi.org/10.3390/economies4040023
  3. Baldwin, R.: The Great Convergence. Information Technology and the New Globalization. The Belknap Press of Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (2016)Google Scholar
  4. Buchtova, B.: Unemployment – a Phenomenon of Globalization? Globalization and its Socio-Economic Consequences, 16th International Scientific Conference Proceedings, Pts I-V (2016)Google Scholar
  5. Fioramonti, L.: A post-GDP world? Rethinking international politics in the 21(st) century. Global Pol. 7(1), 15–24 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12269 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Friedman, T.L.: Lexus şi măslinul. Editura Fundaţiei Pro, Bucureşti (2001)Google Scholar
  7. Keech, W.R.: Global inequality: a new approach for the age of globalization. Indep. Rev. 21(4), 632–635 (2017)Google Scholar
  8. Kostadinova, V.: Brexit is unlikely to provide answers to governance problems under globalisation. Econ. Aff. 37(1), 135–140 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1111/ecaf.12219 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kubicova, J.: Exit Tax in the World of International Migration of Companies and Individuals. Globalization and its Socio-Economic Consequences, 16th International Scientific Conference Proceedings, Pts I-V (2016)Google Scholar
  10. Lawson, R.A.: Global inequality: a new approach for the age of globalization. Public Choice. 170(1–2), 175–176 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-016-0390-z CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Marginean, S.: Economic globalization: from microeconomic foundation to National Determinants. Procedia Econ. Financ. 27, 731–735 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Milanovic, B.: Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Neumann, P.: Is Trade Decline a Start of a New Globalization Trend? Globalization and its Socio-Economic Consequences, 16th International Scientific Conference Proceedings, Pts I-V (2016)Google Scholar
  14. Obstfeld, M.: The initial economic impact of Brexit: an update to early December 2016. Brook. Pap. Econ. Act. 2016, 359–366 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Otsubo, S.T. (ed.): Globalization and Development, Vol III: In Search of a New Development Paradigm (2016)Google Scholar
  16. Pichanic, M., Stankova, A.: "Can The Globalization Reduce Inequality Among The Central European Countries?" (The Case Of Czech Republic). Globalization and Its Socio-Economic Consequences, 16th International Scientific Conference Proceedings, Pts I-V (2016)Google Scholar
  17. Portes, J.: Immigration after Brexit. Natl. Inst. Econ. Rev. 238(1), R13–R21 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1177/002795011623800111 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Rolenc, J.M.: Do Recent International Crises Represent the "End of Globalization"? Globalization and its Socio-Economic Consequences, 16th International Scientific Conference Proceedings, Pts I-V (2016)Google Scholar
  19. Schuman, M.: Brexit Won’t Stop Globalization. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-14/brexit-won-t-stop-globalization. Bloomberg Businessweek (2016). Accessed 15 April 2017
  20. Was Brexit a vote against globalization?. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/08/was-brexit-a-vote-against-globalization (2016). Accessed 15 April 2017
  21. Wen, J., Chang, C.P., Weng, J.H., Liu, J.L.: Globalization and real GDP: new evidence using panel vector autoregression. Singap. Econ. Rev. 61(5), 1550065 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1142/s0217590815500654 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Zhou, Y.R., Coleman, W.D.: Accelerated contagion and response: understanding the relationships among globalization, time, and disease. Globalizations. 13(3), 285–299 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1080/14747731.2015.1056498 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lucian Blaga University of SibiuSibiuRomania

Personalised recommendations