Advanced Modalities and Rescue Therapies for Severe Respiratory Failure

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on frequently used adjuncts to traditional mechanical ventilation that are now available in the intensive care unit to manage severe respiratory failure and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Modalities discussed will include airway pressure release ventilation, high-frequency mechanical ventilation, prone positioning, neuromuscular blockade, inhaled selective pulmonary vasodilators nitric oxide and epoprostenol, and ECMO. These advanced modalities for severe respiratory failure will be described in some detail, but this is not intended as a definitive exploration of each topic. Where available, current data supporting each intervention is presented, but, importantly, definitive high-quality evidence is lacking for several of these modalities.

Keywords

Acute respiratory distress syndrome High-frequency oscillatory ventilation Neuromuscular blockade Airway pressure release ventilation Prone positioning Selective pulmonary vasodilators ECMO 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryBeth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Acute Care Surgery, Trauma and Surgical Critical CareHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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