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Introduction

  • Nadine M. Kalin
Chapter
Part of the Creativity, Education and the Arts book series (CEA)

Abstract

This chapter frames and summarizes the foci of the book. Broadly, I contextualize creativity education today through a heterogeneous approach mobilizing educational policy, theories of creativity, contemporary art, art education, economics, post-political critique, and critical and art theory to reveal the connective threads among diverse aspects of our times that link neoliberalism across nations and phenomenon. The volume is intended to hold up a mirror to our current circumstances while provoking educators out of complacency to start a complicated conversation on creativity, resistance, and criticality to encourage others to join in. In this quest for change, I offer a variety of forms of creativity for the reader’s consideration beyond economized creativity.

Keywords

Creativity Neoliberalism Art education Educational policy Economics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadine M. Kalin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Art Education and Art HistoryUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA

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