Advertisement

Towards Epistemological Pluralism and Transdisciplinarity: Responsible Citizenship, CSR and Sustainability Revisited

  • Rochelle Spencer
  • Megan Paull
  • Martin BruecknerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance book series (CSEG)

Abstract

Today’s global challenges not only threaten humanity’s survival but also that of millions of other species. It is generally agreed that these challenges are the product of anthropogenic impacts on the planet through humanity’s pursuit of economic ends. Due to the intractable nature of these challenges they are often referred to as wicked problems as their complexity and scale are “interconnected, contradictory, located in an uncertain environment and embedded in landscapes that are rapidly changing” (Sardar 2010: 183). However, the global pursuit of economic growth not only threatens to bring about ecological brinkmanship it also produces large societal costs. Dominant neoliberal development policies have largely failed to adequately address inequality or reduce poverty in an age of plenty, which suggests—as argued widely (Kates et al. 2000; Barth et al. 2007; Vare and Scott 2007; Rieckmann 2012; Barth and Rieckmann 2012; Thomas et al. 2013)—that future human wellbeing within environmental limits requires a fundamentally new and different approach; for the purposes of this book we regarded the concepts of responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainable development as expressions of this new approach and the kind of social change agendas that share a vision of a more socially and environmentally just future. It has been the premise of this volume that universities have both the capacity and the responsibility to be the drivers of change towards this vision (Kates et al. 2000).

References

  1. Adomssent M, Michelsen G (2006) German academia heading for sustainability? Reflections on policy and practice in teaching, research and institutional innovations. Environ Educ Res 12(1):85–99CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Adomssent M, Godemann J, Michelsen G (2007) Transferability of approaches to sustainable development at universities as a challenge. Int J Sustain High Educ 8(4):385–402CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Alcaraz JM, Fotaki M (2017) Teaching sustainability and management critically: ‘Expectation failures’ as a powerful pedagogical tool. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  4. Anda M (2017) Business and technology. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  5. Barth M, Rieckmann M (2012) Academic staff development as a catalyst for curriculum change towards education for sustainable development: an output perspective. J Clean Prod 26:28–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Barth M, Godemann J, Rieckmann M, Stoltenberg U (2007) Developing key competencies for sustainable development in higher education. Int J Sustain High Educ 8(4):416–430CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bourdieu P (2001) Science de la science et réflexivité. Raisons d’agir, Paris (English trans. 2004)Google Scholar
  8. Branscomb LM, Kodama F, Florida R (eds) (1999) Industrializing knowledge: university–industry linkages in Japan and the United States. MIT Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  9. Bridle H, Vrieling A, Cardillo M, Araya Y, Hinojosa L (2013) Preparing for an interdisciplinary future: a perspective from early career researchers. Futures 53:22–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Brueckner M (2017) Coming back from the brink: towards a critical, post-autistic approach to economics for sustainability. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  11. Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M, Girardi A, Klomp S (2017) Journeying towards responsible citizenship and sustainability, Chapter 15. In: Arevalo JA, Mitchell SF (eds) Handbook of sustainability in management education: in search of a multidisciplinary, innovative and integrated approach. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, pp 364–384CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Cook I, Haigh Y (2018) Political science and environmental sustainability, responsible citizenship and corporate social responsibility. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  13. Darbellay F (2015) Rethinking inter- and transdisciplinarity: undisciplined knowledge and the emergence of a new thought style. Futures 65:163–174CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Ellis N (2017) Transdisciplinary perspectives on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  15. Etzkowitz H (2002) MIT and the rise of entrepreneurial science. Routledge, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Etzkowitz H, Webster A, Healey P (eds) (1998) Capitalizing knowledge: new intersections of industry and academia. State University of New York, AlbanyGoogle Scholar
  17. Fadeeva Z, Mochizuki Y (2010) Higher education for today and tomorrow: university appraisal for diversity, innovation and change towards sustainable development. Sustain Sci 5(2):249–256CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Fitch K (2017) Public relations and responsible citizenship: communicating CSR and sustainability. Co-creating a CSR strategy with customers to deliver greater value. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  19. Gardner S, Paulin S (2017) The journey of self, nature, technology and sustainable organisational design: insights for transformative leadership praxis. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  20. Gibb A, Haskins G, Robertson I (2009) Leading entrepreneurial university: meeting the entrepreneurial development needs of higher education institutions. National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship (NCGE), CoventryGoogle Scholar
  21. Guterres A (2017) Message to 2017 principles for responsible management education global forum New York, 8 July 2017. www.prme.org/SGlettersigned.pdf. Accessed 21 Aug 2017
  22. Huckel Schneider C, Blyth F (2017) Challenges of integrating evidence into health policy and planning: linking multiple disciplinary approaches. Public Health Res Pract 27(2):e2721719CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. International Association of Universities (2016) Sustainable development. http://www.iau-aiu.net/content/global-higher-education-portal-higher-education-sustainable-development-hesd. Accessed 9 Aug 2017
  24. Kates RW, Clark WC, Corell R, Hall JM, Jaeger CC, Lowe I, McCarthy JJ, Schellnhuber HJ, Bolin B, Dickson NM, Faucheux S, Gallopin GC, Gruebler A, Huntley B, Jäger J, Jodha NS, Kasperson RE, Mabogunje A, Matson P, Mooney H, Moore B III, O’Riordan T, Svedin U (2000) Sustainability science. Harvard University, Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs, and John F. Kennedy School of Government, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  25. Klomp S, Clear A (2017) Senior management perceptions of CSR impact: long-term investment for social good or necessary cost? In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  26. Lang DJ, Wiek A, Bergmann M, Stauffacher M, Martens P, Moll P, Swilling M, Thomas C (2012) Transdisciplinary research in sustainability science – practice, principles and challenges. Sustain Sci 7(supplement 1):25–43CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Lyall C, Meagher LR (2012) A masterclass in interdisciplinarity: research into practice in training the next generation of interdisciplinary researchers. Futures 44:608–617CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Morrison-Saunders A, Hughes M (2017) The challenge of making sustainability accessible in the here and now. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  29. Nicolescu B (2000) Transdisciplinarity and complexity. Bulletin Interactif du CIRET, ParisGoogle Scholar
  30. O’Brien I, Jarvis W, Soutar G, Ouschan R (2017) Co-creating a CSR strategy with customers to deliver greater value. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  31. Paull M, Whitsed C (2017) Why authenticity in corporate and employee volunteering matters for employee engagement: an organisational behaviour perspective. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  32. Philpott K, Dooley L, O’Reilly C, Lupton G (2011) The entrepreneurial university: examining the underlying academic tensions. Technovation 31(4):161–170CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Pigozzi MJ (2010) Implementing the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD): achievements, open questions and strategies for the way forward. Int Rev Educ 56(2/3):255–269CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Redclift MR (2005) Sustainable development (1987–2005) – an oxymoron comes of age. Sustain Dev 13(4):212–227CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Rieckmann M (2012) Future-oriented higher education: which key competencies should be fostered through university teaching and learning? Futures 44:127–135CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Sardar Z (2010) The Namesake: futures; futures studies; futurology; futuristic; foresight – what’s in a name? Futures 42(3):177–184CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Schwenkenbecher A (2017) Emission reductions as a moral obligation of business corporation. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  38. Scott G, Tilbury D, Sharp L, Deane E (2012) Turnaround leadership for sustainability in higher education. University of Western Sydney, Australian National University and Sustainable Futures Leadership Academy, SydneyGoogle Scholar
  39. Segalas Coral J, Tejedor Papell G (2016) The role of transdisciplinarity in research and education for sustainable development. In: Lambrechts W, Hindson J (eds) Research and innovation in education for sustainable development. Environment and school initiatives, pp 197–210Google Scholar
  40. Setó-Pamies D, Papaoikonomou E (2016) A multi-level perspective for the integration of ethics, corporate social responsibility and sustainability (ECSRS) in management education. J Bus Ethics 136(3):523–538CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Slaughter S, Leslie LL (1997) Academic capitalism: politics, policies, and the entrepreneurial university. John Hopkins University Press, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  42. Spencer R (2017) An anthropology of development perspective on CSR for sustainable development. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  43. Thomas I (2010) Critical thinking, transformative learning, sustainable education, and problem-based learning in universities. J Transform Educ 7(3):245–264CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Thomas I, Barth M, Day T (2013) Education for sustainability, graduate capabilities, professional employment: how they all connect. Aust J Environ Educ 29(1):33–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Trireksani T, Zhang J, Djajadikerta HG (2017) Perceived importance of corporate sustainability disclosure: Evidence from China. In: Brueckner M, Spencer R, Paull M (eds) Disciplining the undisciplined? Perspectives from business, society and politics on responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Springer, ChamGoogle Scholar
  46. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) (2005) United nations decade of education for sustainable development 2005–2014. International Implementation Scheme, UNESCO, Paris. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014/001486/148654e.pdf. Accessed Aug 2017
  47. UNU-IAS (United Nations University, Institute of Advanced Studies) (2005) Mobilising for education for sustainable development: towards a global learning space based on regional centres of expertise. UNA-IAS, Sendai. http://www.ias.unu.edu/binaries2/RCEreport.pdf. Accessed Aug 2017Google Scholar
  48. Vare P, Scott W (2007) Learning for a change: exploring the relationship between education and sustainable development. J Educ Sustain Dev 1(2):191–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Wiek A, Withycombe L, Redman CL (2011) Key competencies in sustainability: a reference framework for academic program development. Sustain Sci 6(2):203–218CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Yarime M, Trencher G, Mino T, Scholz RW, Olsson L, Ness B, Frantzeskaki N, Rotmans J (2012) Establishing sustainability science in higher education institutions: towards an integration of academic development, institutionalisation, and stakeholder collaborations. Sustain Sci 7(supplement 1):101–113CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rochelle Spencer
    • 1
  • Megan Paull
    • 1
  • Martin Brueckner
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Centre for Responsible Citizenship and SustainabilityMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia

Personalised recommendations