Feeding Disorders

  • Jonathan K. Fernand
  • Krista Saksena
  • Becky Penrod
  • Mitch J. Fryling
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Feeding problems are common among children but occur at much higher rates in children with developmental disabilities. Difficulties range from mild to severe and may be exacerbated by the symptoms and deficits the child experiences. Due to the functional impairments associated with feeding problems, intervention is often necessary. This chapter reviews the common feeding problems observed in children with developmental disabilities (e.g., food selectivity, food refusal, developmentally inappropriate feeding skills), outcomes of children requiring intervention (e.g., medical, developmental, and social outcomes), assessment methods, treatments, and treatment planning. Clinical considerations are also discussed.

Keywords

Feeding disorders Children Adolescents Applied behavior analysis Assessment Behavioral intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan K. Fernand
    • 1
  • Krista Saksena
    • 2
  • Becky Penrod
    • 2
  • Mitch J. Fryling
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA
  3. 3.Division of Special Education & CounselingCalifornia State University, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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