Self-Injurious Behavior in Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Current Practices in Assessment and Treatment

  • Casey J. Clay
  • Courtney D. Jorgenson
  • SungWoo Kahng
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a behavior which produces physical injury to the individual’s own body. Common forms of SIB include, but are not limited to, head banging, biting, scratching, skin picking, hair pulling, pinching, and eye gouging. Among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), there is a higher prevalence of SIB in children than in adults. Proper measurement (e.g., frequency and duration) and assessment (i.e., direct and indirect) of SIB are needed prior to starting treatment. In this chapter, we review the assessment and treatment procedures found to be effective in reducing and eliminating SIB in children with IDD.

Keywords

Self-injurious behavior Children Developmental disabilities Intellectual disabilities Assessment Behavioral intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Casey J. Clay
    • 1
  • Courtney D. Jorgenson
    • 2
  • SungWoo Kahng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Health PsychologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special EducationUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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