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Morphea

  • Enzo Errichetti
  • Giuseppe Stinco
Chapter

Abstract

Morphea, or localized scleroderma, is a connective tissue disorder characterized by thickening of the dermis and/or subcutaneous tissues. The dermatoscopic hallmark of morphea is the presence of the so-called white fibrotic beams, which are commonly associated with linear branching vessels. Such structures correspond to dermal fibrosis and appear as whitish structureless areas with blurry edges. They are often detectable even in clinically non-sclerotic lesions, thereby addressing early recognition of this disorder.

Keywords

Morphea Localized scleroderma Connective tissue disorders White fibrotic beams Linear branching vessels 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical AreaInstitute of Dermatology, University of UdineUdineItaly

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