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Securitization of Islam in US Foreign Policy: The Clinton Administration

  • Erdoan A. Shipoli
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Abstract

The next three chapters constitute the main discussions of the book. This chapter argues that the securitization of Islam was a long-standing campaign, especially after the Cold War. Nevertheless, the Clinton administration decided to approach Islam and Muslims in a more constructive, political way.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erdoan A. Shipoli
    • 1
  1. 1.Visiting Scholar at the Center for Muslim Christian UnderstandingGeorgetown UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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