Mapping: Wordsworth and Poems on the Renaming of Places

  • Nikki Hessell
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print book series (PERCP)

Abstract

Hessell rethinks William Wordsworth’s poetry within the framework of colonial mapping and recent scholarship on decolonising maps. This chapter looks at the Kerala author Pallath Raman’s 1923 translation of Wordsworth’s poem “The Farmer of Tilsbury Vale.” The chapter proposes that Raman’s approach to mapping Wordsworth’s England reveals historical anxieties about mapping processes in southern India around 1800, which had transformed the way India was conceived by the British, and which were the subject of strenuous decolonisation efforts in the twentieth century. Hessell argues for rereading “The Farmer of Tilsbury Vale” as one of Wordsworth’s “Poems on the Naming of Places,” and that those poems should be reconsidered as specifically colonial and indigenous, despite their attention to Lake District topography and toponymy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikki Hessell
    • 1
  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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