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The Genus Amblyomma Koch, 1844

  • Ivan G. Horak
  • Heloise Heyne
  • Roy Williams
  • G. James Gallivan
  • Arthur M. Spickett
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
Chapter

Abstract

The 11 species in the genus Amblyomma that are, or have been, found in Southern African are illustrated and described, their geographic distributions mapped, their hosts listed, and when available, their life cycles, seasonal abundance and role as vectors of disease are provided.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivan G. Horak
    • 1
  • Heloise Heyne
    • 2
  • Roy Williams
    • 2
  • G. James Gallivan
    • 3
  • Arthur M. Spickett
    • 2
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
    • 4
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of PretoriaOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  2. 2.ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary InstituteOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of SwazilandKwaluseniSwaziland
  4. 4.YzerfonteinSouth Africa
  5. 5.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZaragozaZaragozaSpain

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