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History

  • Ivan G. Horak
  • Heloise Heyne
  • Roy Williams
  • G. James Gallivan
  • Arthur M. Spickett
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
Chapter

Abstract

The recorded history of tick taxonomy and the contributions that taxonomists have made towards an understanding of the tick fauna of South Africa date back to 1778. The history from then on has been pieced together by Gertrud Theiler in her review on ‘Past workers on ticks and tick-borne diseases in southern Africa’, by Jane Walker in ‘A review of the ixodid ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) occurring in southern Africa’, and I.G. Horak in ‘Parasitology: Onderstepoort 1908–2008’ and ‘A century of tick taxonomy in South Africa’.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivan G. Horak
    • 1
  • Heloise Heyne
    • 2
  • Roy Williams
    • 2
  • G. James Gallivan
    • 3
  • Arthur M. Spickett
    • 2
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
    • 4
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of PretoriaOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  2. 2.ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary InstituteOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of SwazilandKwaluseniSwaziland
  4. 4.YzerfonteinSouth Africa
  5. 5.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZaragozaZaragozaSpain

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