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Introduction

  • Ivan G. Horak
  • Heloise Heyne
  • Roy Williams
  • G. James Gallivan
  • Arthur M. Spickett
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
Chapter

Abstract

Southern Africa is comprised of the countries of South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland and Lesotho. For the purposes of this book, we are also including the Maputo Province of Mozambique as it abuts the eastern borders of South Africa and Swaziland, and the vegetation is contiguous with that of the north-eastern part of the South African province of Kwazulu-Natal. The hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) are ectoparasites of vertebrates, and infest a large number of Southern African vertebrate species. Eighty-three ixodid tick species have been described as having distributions that include Southern Africa and 22 of these species have distributions confined to Southern Africa.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivan G. Horak
    • 1
  • Heloise Heyne
    • 2
  • Roy Williams
    • 2
  • G. James Gallivan
    • 3
  • Arthur M. Spickett
    • 2
  • J. Dürr Bezuidenhout
    • 4
  • Agustín Estrada-Peña
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of PretoriaOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  2. 2.ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary InstituteOnderstepoortSouth Africa
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of SwazilandKwaluseniSwaziland
  4. 4.YzerfonteinSouth Africa
  5. 5.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZaragozaZaragozaSpain

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