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The Live, the Dead, and the Digital

  • Yngvar Kjus
Chapter
Part of the Pop Music, Culture and Identity book series (PMCI)

Abstract

The last chapter engages with the fundamental relationship between live and recorded music. It assesses how the anchoring of music in time and place, as live and recorded, is being digitally renegotiated and stresses the importance of this process to understanding contemporary developments in the music experience. It delineates the rise of new structures for the making and mediation of music in private and public contexts and addresses how these are shaped through the interactions of artists, intermediaries, and audiences. The chapter highlights the capacity of the terminology of the live and the recorded to gain fresh relevance in the face of new circumstances, triggering as well as illuminating new questions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yngvar Kjus
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Media and CommunicationUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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