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School Leadership Is Context Dependent

  • Paul W. Miller
Chapter
Part of the Intercultural Studies in Education book series (ISE)

Abstract

Successful school leadership is not a “one size fits all” approach. Each school is unique. Therefore, school leaders, whether experienced or not, whether possessing experience of leading in one or more schools—cannot simply transfer approaches between schools and/or between experiences—no matter how well these may have worked elsewhere. For, in-as-much as the practice of school leadership is shaped by internal, external and individual factors, school leadership is also bound by time, place and space. That is, context. Clarke (2003, Mastering the Art of Extreme Juggling: An Examination of the Contemporary Role of the Queensland Teaching Principal. Report for Queensland Association of State School Principals, Australia) and Hallinger (2016, Building a Global Knowledge Base in Educational Leadership and Management: Bringing Context Out of the Shadows of Leadership. Keynote Speech at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Leadership and Management Society (BELMAS), Chester, England) suggest it is impossible to measure leadership effectiveness without understanding context. The main finding of this chapter is that, a school operates within different layers of context—social, cultural, political, religious, economic and so on—and how a school leader leads in a particular context is the result of ongoing interaction and negotiation. Evidence also suggests that whereas school leaders/leadership influences context, context can also have a major impact on school leaders/leadership.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul W. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Education and Professional DevelopmentUniversity of HuddersfieldHuddersfieldUK

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