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Introduction: Liberating Wonder

  • Glenn Willmott
Chapter
Part of the Literatures, Cultures, and the Environment book series (LCE)

Abstract

How is it that wonder has fallen among the lost illusions of a disenchanted modernity, yet also been ceaselessly, imaginatively sought after by its culture industries? Why has wonder remained marginal in literary and cultural studies, as a critical concept or as a type of ethical or political experience? Why do we need to cultivate wonder? Willmott situates wonder in current notions of disenchantment and re-enchantment as a starting point to understanding its value to ecological and pro-social learning. He provides an outline of his trajectory in the book, from theory, to poetics, to historical and political considerations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn Willmott
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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