Cropping Pattern to Face Climate Change Stress

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology book series (BRIEFSWATER)

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to quantify the effect of climate change in 2030 on the prevailing cropping pattern, in terms of increasing water requirements of the crops, which could result in the reduction of cultivated area. Furthermore, testing the effect management practices on the cultivated area of the copping pattern was also done in the five agro-climatic zones of Egypt. Our results indicated that increasing water requirements for the cultivated crops in each agro-climatic zone in 2030 will result in decrease in the cultivated area of these crops. The analysis showed that the cultivated area in the prevailing cropping pattern will be reduced in 2030 by 13%, compared to its counterpart value in 2014/15. A cropping pattern was suggested, where changing cultivation methods to raised beds will increase the cultivated area by 9%, compared to its counterpart value in 2014/2015. Furthermore, another cropping pattern was suggested, where cultivation on raised beds and polycropping will increase the cultivated area by 32%. Thus, the suggested management will overcome the stress resulted from climate change on the prevailing cropping pattern in the future.

Keywords

Heat stress Raised beds cultivation Polycropping Intercropping techniques 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Water Requirements and Field Irrigation Research DepartmentSoils, Water and Environment Research Institute, Agricultural Research CenterGizaEgypt
  2. 2.Crops Intensification Research DepartmentField Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research CenterGizaEgypt

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