Prevailing Cropping Pattern

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology book series (BRIEFSWATER)

Abstract

The objective of this chapter was to assess the cultivated area in the cropping pattern recorded in 2014/15 growing seasons in the five agroclimatic zones in Egypt, as well as its water requirements. The distribution of the five main crops (wheat, maize, clover, cotton, and sugarcane) in the five agroclimatic zones was assessed, with respect to its cultivated area, as well as its applied irrigation amounts in 2014/15 cropping pattern. In addition to these five main crops, other crops are also cultivated and its water requirements were calculated. The total cultivated area was found to be around 6.3 million hectares, required around 62.3 billion cubic meters of irrigation water. The cultivated area of wheat represented that highest area in the winter season, followed by clover and sugar beet. Whereas, in the summer season, maize had the highest cultivate area followed by fruit trees and rice. The prevailing cropping pattern resulted in food gaps in wheat, maize, faba bean, oil crops, sugar crops, and summer forage crops. Thus, it needs to be modified to reduce these food gaps and increase food security.

Keywords

Main crops in Egypt Other cultivated crops in Egypt Agroclimatic zones of Egypt Food gaps in Egypt 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Water Requirements and Field Irrigation Research DepartmentSoils, Water and Environment Research Institute, Agricultural Research CenterGizaEgypt
  2. 2.Crops Intensification Research DepartmentField Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research CenterGizaEgypt

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