Introduction to SAS Graphics

  • Mervyn G. Marasinghe
  • Kenneth J. Koehler
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS)

Abstract

Template-based SAS statistical graphics are introduced here using the SAS ODS graphics-based SG (statistical graphics) system. The SAS procedures SGPLOT, SGPANEL, and SGSCATTER are discussed along with key statements available for producing many useful statistical graphics applications. Other SAS procedures such as UNIVARIATE, TTEST, and GLM that produce template-based graphics are also used in various illustrations.

Keywords

ODS destination HTMLBlue style Proc SGPLOT Proc univariate ODS SELECT Proc ttest Confidence ellipses Prediction ellipses Density estimate Histogram Probability plot Proc SGPANEL Homogeneity of variances Multi-cell plots Reference lines Legends Marker attributes Line attributes Binwidths Kernel density Schematic box plots Adjacent values IQR Profile plot Bar charts Panel cells Proc SGSCATTER Scatter plot matrix Attribute maps Style attributes 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mervyn G. Marasinghe
    • 1
  • Kenneth J. Koehler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of StatisticsIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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