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‘The Times, They Are a Changin’

  • Lucy Neville
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter looks at how the perception of women’s involvement in the consumption of pornography is changing in this post Fifty Shades … world. It explores how the 525 women surveyed and interviewed see women’s consumption of porn as having changed since they first engaged with m/m SEM. It also examines how engagement with m/m porn and erotica has changed the women’s own views around gender, sex, and sexuality.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucy Neville
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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