Advertisement

Life-Course Health and Inequality

  • Agar Brugiavini
  • Ludovico Carrino
  • Cristina Elisa Orso
  • Giacomo Pasini
Chapter

Abstract

In Chap.  5, we address the “health equity” issue related to the access to formal home care services across a set of European countries. We make use of the individual-level eligibility index developed in Chap.  4, and relate it to the most relevant “covariates”. The novelty of this chapter is that, by using the SHARE and the ELSA data, we can analyse the effect of adverse health shocks occurring during individuals’ lives as captured by a cumulative measure of health deterioration. The purpose of the analysis is to compare individuals with similar socio-economic backgrounds and similar health histories, by distinguishing those who may face the need for LTC as a result of a health shock: this is the “demand side” of the programme. However, depending on the LTC regulation to which these individuals are exposed, they will have different probabilities of access to care and different coverage, i.e., there is also a “supply side”. We describe how different LTC systems cope with the “cumulative health disadvantage”.

Keywords

Demand for care Health shocks Chronic diseases Health equity Cumulative health disadvantage 

References

  1. Banks, J., Marmot, M., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. P. (2006). Disease and disadvantage in the United States and in England. JAMA, 295(17), 2037–2045.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Börsch-Supan, A., & Jürges, H. (2005). The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe—Methodology. Mannheim: MEA.Google Scholar
  3. Eleftheriades, C., & Wittenberg, R. (2013). A critical review of international practice on assessment and eligibility in adult social care: Lessons for England. Oxford: Centre for Health Service Economics & Organisation (CHSEO).Google Scholar
  4. Fabbri, E., Zoli, M., Gonzalez-Freire, M., Salive, M. E., Studenski, S. A., & Ferrucci, L. (2015). Aging and multimorbidity: New tasks, priorities, and frontiers for integrated gerontological and clinical research. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16(8), 640–647.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Mazzonna, F. (2014). The long lasting effects of education on old age health: Evidence of gender differences. Social Science & Medicine, 101, 129–138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Sirin, S. R. (2005). Socioeconomic status and academic achievement: A meta-analytic review of research. Review of Educational Research, 75(3), 417–453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Taylor, R., Conway, L., Calderwood, L., Lessof, C., Cheshire, H., Cox, K., & Scholes, S. (2007). Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: The 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; Technical Report. London: Institute of Fiscal Studies.Google Scholar
  8. Taylor, R., Conway, L., Caldenwood, L., Lessof, C., Marmot, J., Banks, R., … Nazroo, J. (2003). Methodology. Health, wealth, and lifestyles of the older population in England: The 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (pp. 357–374). London: The Institute for Fiscal Studies.Google Scholar
  9. Yach, D., Hawkes, C., Gould, C. L., & Hofman, K. J. (2004). The global burden of chronic diseases: Overcoming impediments to prevention and control. JAMA, 291(21), 2616–2622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agar Brugiavini
    • 1
  • Ludovico Carrino
    • 2
  • Cristina Elisa Orso
    • 1
  • Giacomo Pasini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsCa’ Foscari UniversityVeniceItaly
  2. 2.Department of Global Health & Social MedicineKing’s CollegeLondonUK

Personalised recommendations