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Introduction

  • Agar Brugiavini
  • Ludovico Carrino
  • Cristina Elisa Orso
  • Giacomo Pasini
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces the topics covered in this book. The effective coverage and the overall quality in terms of the well-being of the target population reached by a given long-term care (LTC) programme are the result of a complex interaction of a number of determinants, which require a careful analysis of the different steps involved in the process. Hence, presenting a complete picture, analysing a detailed taxonomy and drawing some useful conclusions about the risk of vulnerability and the extent of dependency in old age represents a challenge because of the variety of solutions adopted in Europe. Our analysis makes two substantial contributions: the estimation of the coverage rates results from country-specific definitions of vulnerability, which have not been considered to date, without the imposition of any a priori criteria; second, the use of micro-data allows us to control for the different epidemiologic characteristics of European countries.

Keywords

Ageing Long-term care eligibility criteria Vulnerability Long-term care coverage Health equity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agar Brugiavini
    • 1
  • Ludovico Carrino
    • 2
  • Cristina Elisa Orso
    • 1
  • Giacomo Pasini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsCa’ Foscari UniversityVeniceItaly
  2. 2.Department of Global Health & Social MedicineKing’s CollegeLondonUK

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