Methodology

  • Sima Barmania
  • Michael J. Reiss
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Public Health book series (BRIEFSPUBLIC)

Abstract

This chapter describes both the qualitative and quantitative methods employed for this study. Qualitative interviews were employed to explore the experiences, attitudes and practices of three stakeholder groups: people living with HIV; religious leaders; and officials from the Ministry of Health. A total of 35 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face, audio-taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Quantitative data were obtained from the same three groups by means of a common questionnaire. In all, 252 completed questionnaires were obtained and analysis was undertaken using SPSS.

Keywords

Qualitative methodology Quantitative methodology In-depth interviews Surveys Framework analysis 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sima Barmania
    • 1
  • Michael J. Reiss
    • 1
  1. 1.UCL Institute of EducationUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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