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Innovations in MedFT: Pioneering New Frontiers!

  • Jennifer Hodgson
  • Tai Mendenhall
  • Angela Lamson
  • Macaran Baird
  • Jackie Williams-Reade
Chapter
Part of the Focused Issues in Family Therapy book series (FIFT)

Abstract

The principal advantages for pioneering new territory lay in both the creativity for courageous individuals and opportunities for those who follow. The West was settled on inspiration (and perspiration) fueled by a desire for a better way, a better life, and a more hopeful future. Likewise, the development of medical family therapy (MedFT) grew from a need in healthcare for a more collaborative, relationally based, and systemic system. Today, it is finding its place. Much like pioneering settlers, MedFTs have moved from the most populated areas to those in need of more development. With each step, there is continued learning and growing appreciation for each setting’s unique population, needs, diverse cultures, and resources. In McDaniel, Hepworth, and Doherty’s (1992) early primer, primary care was described as an ideal environment for MedFT. Over the years, this scope and attention has evolved to include secondary and tertiary care settings. This book attempts to serve as a learning tool for new and experienced professionals wanting to develop as MedFTs and who wish to expand into new territories for which they were not formally trained.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Hodgson
    • 1
  • Tai Mendenhall
    • 2
  • Angela Lamson
    • 1
  • Macaran Baird
    • 3
  • Jackie Williams-Reade
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family ScienceEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Social ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family Medicine and Community HealthUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  4. 4.School of Behavioral HealthLoma Linda UniversityLoma LindaUSA

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