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Sampling, Sample Handling, Sample Analysis and Laboratory Quality Assurance

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
Chapter

Abstract

Many different types of samples are collected and submitted to the laboratory for analysis. Some are sample units from lots or consignments of foods or ingredients for lot acceptance determination. Others may be for investigational purposes to assess control of the environment, investigate the source of a problem or to validate a process. Some may have legal implications relative to a lawsuit or for regulatory compliance. This chapter will discuss some of the major factors that should be considered when collecting sample units, shipping them to a laboratory, their preparation for analysis, analytical procedures, including laboratory quality assurance.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert L. Buchanan, editorial committee chairRiverside Corporate Park CSIRONorth RydeAustralia

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