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Meeting FSO and PO Through Control Measures

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
Chapter

Abstract

FBOs have to go through two important steps before bringing a new food product to market. They first develop a validated product and process design for their food product that will meet the relevant objective for safety. Then, this design is implemented operationally, at the point in the food supply chain that the FBO is operating at and/or is responsible for, using a food safety management system that is based on good practices (also known as prerequisite programs) and the principles of HACCP.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert L. Buchanan, editorial committee chairRiverside Corporate Park CSIRONorth RydeAustralia

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