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Evaluating Risks and Establishing Food Safety Objectives and Performance Objectives

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
Chapter

Abstract

Societies charge public institutions and organizations with defining the “level of protection” regarding risks in daily life that should be achieved to assure the health and safety of the public. In the case of food safety, this responsibility usually resides with competent authorities that have been given this mandate by national or local legislation. Industry is responsible for assuring the safety of the products that they put onto the market or that they sell to the public. Within the context of their specific responsibilities, government and industry function as risk managers and share the common goal of ensuring that consumers can enjoy safe and wholesome foods.

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert L. Buchanan, editorial committee chairRiverside Corporate Park CSIRONorth RydeAustralia

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