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Listeria monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Deli-Meats

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
Chapter

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen which is widely distributed in nature and can be found on almost all foods, in soil, water, sewage, silage, slaughterhouse waste, milk from healthy and mastitic cows, as well as in human and animal feces (Farber and Peterkin 1991, 1999; Sauders et al. 2006, 2012). It is among a small number of foodborne pathogens that are capable of growth at low temperatures, to survive for very long periods of time in food processing facilities and its association with a high case-fatality rates. Although foodborne listeriosis occurs infrequently, at somewhere between 2 and 6 cases annually per million of population, between 20 to 30% of the cases are fatal (McLauchlin 1993; Rocourt 1996; Mead et al. 1999; Silk et al. 2012).

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert L. Buchanan, editorial committee chairRiverside Corporate Park CSIRONorth RydeAustralia

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