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Microbiological Hazards and Their Control

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this book is to introduce the reader to a structured approach for managing food safety, including setting management goals for food safety management systems, sampling and microbiological testing. This structured approach connects governmental food safety management in the context of public health protection with operational management activities at individual stages of or across a food supply chain. An important feature of the structured approach is that it is based on an appreciation of risk rather than the potential presence of a hazard. From the perspective of national competent authorities, the framework of risk analysis (RA) provides a systematic approach to food safety management decision making. Operationally, general food safety management relies heavily on prerequisite programs, such as Good Hygienic Practice (GHP), Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). Prerequisite programs support systems based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles, which manage food safety more specifically and tailored to a particular food business operation. For the purposes of brevity, “prerequisite programs” is used as a collective term throughout this chapter where the suite of good practice programs is relevant.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert L. Buchanan, editorial committee chairRiverside Corporate Park CSIRONorth RydeAustralia

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