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Psychotherapy and Social Neuroscience: Forging Links Together

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Neuroscience and Social Science

Abstract

Psychotherapy drew on social science to forge the epistemological and methodological approach for its development and validation. Although its emphasis on psychosocial premises isolated it from neurobiological processes, psychotherapy never resigned such concerns. Against this background, here we review studies integrating psychotherapy and neuroscience, focusing on studies that show the path for establishing joint research programs. We describe strategies and instruments that have been used in the literature and identify relevant methodological challenges. In addition, we consider empathy and interpersonal relationships as concepts that can bridge social neuroscience with concepts from psychotherapy, such as therapeutic alliance and emotional regulation. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the integration of these two fields promotes practice-oriented research with valid information to empower practitioners (psychotherapists, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals) in their work with patients.

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Correspondence to Andrés Roussos .

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Roussos, A., Braun, M., Aufenacker, S., Olivera, J. (2017). Psychotherapy and Social Neuroscience: Forging Links Together. In: Ibáñez, A., Sedeño, L., García, A. (eds) Neuroscience and Social Science. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68421-5_13

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