Democracy, Liberalism, and Moral Order in Wilhelm Röpke: A Comparison with James M. Buchanan

Chapter
Part of the The European Heritage in Economics and the Social Sciences book series (EHES, volume 20)

Abstract

By analyzing how excessive state intervention leads to the bureaucratization of the economy and primarily benefits a class of politicians and bureaucrats, Wilhelm Röpke anticipated core elements of Public Choice Theory. In Ciampini’s account, Röpke described the behavior of special interest groups who exploited the dynamics of the welfare state’s growth, pressuring politicians and bureaucrats to extract additional privileges. According to Ciampini, Röpke conceived a series of public choice arguments before key concepts like “rent-seeking” were formulated by Public Choice theorists James M. Buchanan and Gordon Tullock. In this analysis, Röpke’s understanding of the political process comes close to Buchanan’s research programs of Public Choice and of Constitutional Political Economy.

References

  1. Abbagnano N (2001) Positivismo. In: Dizionario di Filosofia. UTET, TurinGoogle Scholar
  2. Brennan G, Buchanan JM (1980) The power to tax. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 9. Liberty Fund, IndianapolisGoogle Scholar
  3. Brennan G, Buchanan JM (1985) The reason of rules. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 10. Liberty Fund, IndianapolisGoogle Scholar
  4. Buchanan JM (1979) Politics without romance: a sketch of positive public choice theory and its normative implications. In: The logical foundations of constitutional liberty. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 1. Liberty Fund, Indianapolis, pp 45–59Google Scholar
  5. Buchanan JM (1986a) The potential for tyranny in politics as science. In: Buchanan JM (ed) Liberty, market and state. Political economy in the 1980s. Wheatsheaf Books, Brighton, pp 40–54Google Scholar
  6. Buchanan JM (1986b) Debt, demos, and the welfare state. In: Buchanan JM (ed) Liberty, market and state. Political economy in the 1980s. Wheatsheaf Books, Brighton, pp 210–222Google Scholar
  7. Buchanan JM (1992) Better than plowing. In: The logical foundations of constitutional liberty. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 1. Liberty Fund, Indianapolis, pp 11–27Google Scholar
  8. Buchanan JM, Tullock G (1962) The calculus of consent. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 3. Liberty Fund, IndianapolisCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Buchanan JM, Wagner RE (1977) Democracy in deficit: the political legacy of Lord Keynes. The collected works of James M. Buchanan, vol 8. Liberty Fund, IndianapolisGoogle Scholar
  10. Burgin A (2012) The great persuasion. Reinventing free markets since the depression. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MACrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gregg S (2010) Wilhem Röpke’s political economy. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hayek FA (1944) The road to serfdom. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  13. Hayek FA (1954) Capitalism and the historians. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  14. Hutchison TW (1981) The politics and philosophy of economics. Marxians, Keynesians and Austrians. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  15. Marciano A (2016) Buchanan’s non-coercive economics for self-interested individuals: ethics, small groups, and social contract. J Hist Econ Thought 38(1):1–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Mises L (1912) Theorie des Geldes und der Umlaufsmittel. Duncker & Humblot, Munich. English edition: Mises L (1952) The theory of money and credit. Yale University Press, New HavenGoogle Scholar
  17. Mosca G (1896) Elementi di scienza politica. Bocca, TurinGoogle Scholar
  18. Reisman DA (1990) The political economy of James Buchanan. Palgrave Macmillan, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Röpke W (1933) End of an era? reprinted in: Röpke W (1969) Against the tide. Henry Regnery, Chicago, pp 79–97Google Scholar
  20. Röpke W (1937) Die Lehre von der Wirtschaft. Julius Springer, Vienna. English edition: Röpke W (1963) Economics of the free society. Henry Regnery, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  21. Röpke W (1942) Gesellschaftskrisis der Gegenwart. Eugen Rentsch, Erlenbach-Zurich. English edition: Röpke W (1992) The social crisis of our time. Transaction, New BrunswickGoogle Scholar
  22. Röpke W (1951) The problem of economic order. Reprinted in: Overbeek J (ed) (1987) 2 Essays by Wilhelm Röpke: The problem of economic order; Welfare, freedom and inflation. University Press of America, LanhamGoogle Scholar
  23. Röpke W (1957) Liberalism and Christianity. Reprinted in: Panichas G (ed) (1988) Modern age: the first twenty five-years: a selection: Liberty Press, Indianapolis, pp 513–519Google Scholar
  24. Röpke W (1958) Jenseits von Angebot und Nachfrage. Eugen Rentsch, Erlenbach-Zurich. English edition: Röpke W (1960) A humane economy: the social framework of the free market. Henry Regnery, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  25. Röpke W (1959) I gruppi di pressione’ e l’ultima istanza. Studi economici XIV:480–485Google Scholar
  26. Röpke W (1964) Welfare, freedom and inflation. University of Alabama Press, TuscaloosaGoogle Scholar
  27. Rüstow A (1932) Liberal intervention (Freie Wirtschaft – Starker Staat). Reprinted in: Wünsche H (ed) (1982) Standard texts on the Social Market Economy. Gustav Fischer, Stuttgart, pp 37–48Google Scholar
  28. Schoeck H (1969) Envy: a theory of social behaviour. Harcourt, Brace & World, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  29. Talmon J (1952) The origins of totalitarian democracy. Secker & Warburg, LondonGoogle Scholar
  30. Vanberg V (1988) “Ordnungstheorie” as constitutional economics – the German conceptions of the Social Market Economy. ORDO Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 39:17–31Google Scholar
  31. Vanberg V (2004) The Freiburg School: Walter Eucken and ordoliberalism. Discussion Paper 04/11, Walter Eucken Institut, FreiburgGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political and Social SciencesUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Department of PhilosophyParis-Sorbonne University (Paris IV)ParisFrance

Personalised recommendations