Enhancing Virtual Learning Spaces: The Impact of the Gaming Analytics

  • Anastasios Karakostas
  • Anastasios Maronidis
  • Dimitrios Ververidis
  • Efstathios Nikolaidis
  • Anastasios Papazoglou Chalikias
  • Spiros Nikolopoulos
  • Ioannis Kompatsiaris
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies book series (LNDECT, volume 11)

Abstract

Online virtual labs have been important to educational practice by providing students with distance courses that otherwise would be difficult to be offered. However, the majority of them cannot be easily applied to different courses or pedagogical approaches. In order to overcome this, we propose a high-level, easy-to-use authoring tool that will allow building course-independent high-standard virtual labs. This solution is based on learning and gaming analytics . Ιn the gaming industry, there have been developed strong game analytics methods and tools, which could be easily transferred into the learning domain. Game analytics monitor the users’ activity; model their current behavior through the use of shallow analytics and predict the future behavior of the users through the use of deep analytics. We propose that both of these approaches combined with visualization methodologies will offer insights on what features are important and what functionalities users expect to find in a virtual lab.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research leading to these results has received funding from ENVISAGE project that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 731900.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anastasios Karakostas
    • 1
  • Anastasios Maronidis
    • 1
  • Dimitrios Ververidis
    • 1
  • Efstathios Nikolaidis
    • 1
  • Anastasios Papazoglou Chalikias
    • 1
  • Spiros Nikolopoulos
    • 1
  • Ioannis Kompatsiaris
    • 1
  1. 1.Information Technologies InstituteCentre for Research and Technology HellasThermiGreece

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