Essential Landscape: An Environmental History of Chaparral Ecosystems in California

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Although chaparral is the most extensive, native plant habitat in California, it is not well understood in terms of the biodiversity it contains and the ecosystem services it provides. This was not always the case, and this chapter will explore what those inhabiting this region—native people, Spanish missionaries, US resource extractors, and conservationists—have known about this dynamic habitat, how their knowledge has changed over time, and why. Drawing on the insights of anthropology, archaeology, history and cultural studies, the chapter documents the evolving and reciprocal relationship between humans and the chaparral ecosystems that for millennia have sustained them in California.

Keywords

Abbott Kinney Biodiversity Chaparral ecosystem Chumash Conservation John Muir LA County Fire Department San Bernardino Mountains San Gabriel Mountains Sierra Mountains Southern California Spanish Missions Stuart Flintham Tongva US Forest Service 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pomona CollegeClaremontUSA

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